Amalthea (amaltheae) wrote,
Amalthea
amaltheae

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Dr. Suess and other madness

Taken from an email going around:

The binLadinch

Every U down in Uville liked U.S. a lot,
But the binLadinch, who lived Far East of Uville, did not.
The binLadinch hated U.S! the whole U.S. way!
Now don't ask me why, for nobody can say,
It could be his turban was screwed on too tight.
Or the sun from the desert had beaten too bright
But I think that the most likely reason of all
May have been that his heart was two sizes too small.


But, Whatever the reason, his heart or his turban,
He stood facing Uville, the part that was urban.
"They're doing their business," he snarled from his perch.
"They're raising their families! They're going to church!
They're leading the world, and their empire is thriving,
I MUST keep the S's and U's from surviving!"


Tomorrow, he knew, all the U's and the S's,
Would put on their pants and their shirts and their dresses,
They'd go to their offices, playgrounds and schools,
And abide by their U and S values and rules,


And then they'd do something he liked least of all,
Every U down in U-ville, the tall and the small,
Would stand all united, each U and each S,
And they'd sing Uville's anthem, "God bless us! God bless!"
All around their Twin Towers of Uville, they'd stand,
and their voices would drown every sound in the land.


"I must stop that singing," binLadinch said with a smirk,
And he had an idea-an idea that might work!
The binLadinch stole some U airplanes in U morning hours,
And crashed them right into the Uville Twin Towers.
"They'll wake to disaster!" he snickered, so sour,
"And how can they sing when they can't find a tower?"


The binLadinch cocked his ear as they woke from their sleeping,
All set to enjoy their U-wailing and weeping,
Instead he heard something that started quite low,
And it built up quite slow, but it started to grow-
And the binLadinch heard the most unpredictable thing...
And he couldn't believe it-they started to sing!


He stared down at U-ville, not trusting his eyes,
What he saw was a shocking, disgusting surprise!
Every U down in U-ville, the tall and the small,
Was singing! Without any towers at all!
He HADN'T stopped U-Ville from singing! It sung!
For down deep in the hearts of the old and the young,
Those Twin Towers were standing, called Hope and called Pride,
And you can't smash the towers we hold deep inside.


So we circle the sites where our heroes did fall,
With a hand in each hand of the tall and the small,
And we mourn for our losses while knowing we'll cope,
For we still have inside that U-Pride and U-Hope.


For America means a bit more than tall towers,
It means more than wealth or political powers,
It's more than our enemies ever could guess,
So may God bless America! Bless us! God bless!


I forwarded this to an old friend that I lost touch with for many years and just rediscovered and was suprised about the ways in which our lives and thoughts had diverged so much. She said she was depressed by it. She felt it a cruel thing to do to an elegant Dr. Suess tale. She expressed much frustration with the current events and the things tragedies pring out in people who are suddenly awakened to their perpetual lack of safety in the universe and especially those who deal with it through a desire for profound violence.

It was a fascinating perspective and made me really think. I guess the thing that made me like the poem was that it was an attempt to draw a parallel in terms we would all understand that violence was not the answer, so much as a coming together to sing and overcome the pain. And for me, it was a tribute to the genius of Dr. Suess that we find parallels to such things even in times like these in his works. I've included my reaction because it explains much about me, I think.

"*blink* Wow. I'm sort of surprised by your reaction to it. I guess that compared to a lot of things that I've read on the subject this one at least seemed genuine from someone and understanding that this was not a war against Islam or the like. I personally find it a tribute to Dr. Suess' power and the amount that he has touched all of our lives that it is often him we return to at times of moral and ethical crisis, despite the child-like-ness of his verse. Yes, it's not as good as the first, but I suspect it's author knew it could never be and wanted other people to see the connections in it that he saw as apropos of our time."

"
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Taken from an email going around:

The binLadinch

Every U down in Uville liked U.S. a lot,
But the binLadinch, who lived Far East of Uville, did not.
The binLadinch hated U.S! the whole U.S. way!
Now don't ask me why, for nobody can say,
It could be his turban was screwed on too tight.
Or the sun from the desert had beaten too bright
But I think that the most likely reason of all
May have been that his heart was two sizes too small.


But, Whatever the reason, his heart or his turban,
He stood facing Uville, the part that was urban.
"They're doing their business," he snarled from his perch.
"They're raising their families! They're going to church!
They're leading the world, and their empire is thriving,
I MUST keep the S's and U's from surviving!"


Tomorrow, he knew, all the U's and the S's,
Would put on their pants and their shirts and their dresses,
They'd go to their offices, playgrounds and schools,
And abide by their U and S values and rules,


And then they'd do something he liked least of all,
Every U down in U-ville, the tall and the small,
Would stand all united, each U and each S,
And they'd sing Uville's anthem, "God bless us! God bless!"
All around their Twin Towers of Uville, they'd stand,
and their voices would drown every sound in the land.


"I must stop that singing," binLadinch said with a smirk,
And he had an idea-an idea that might work!
The binLadinch stole some U airplanes in U morning hours,
And crashed them right into the Uville Twin Towers.
"They'll wake to disaster!" he snickered, so sour,
"And how can they sing when they can't find a tower?"


The binLadinch cocked his ear as they woke from their sleeping,
All set to enjoy their U-wailing and weeping,
Instead he heard something that started quite low,
And it built up quite slow, but it started to grow-
And the binLadinch heard the most unpredictable thing...
And he couldn't believe it-they started to sing!


He stared down at U-ville, not trusting his eyes,
What he saw was a shocking, disgusting surprise!
Every U down in U-ville, the tall and the small,
Was singing! Without any towers at all!
He HADN'T stopped U-Ville from singing! It sung!
For down deep in the hearts of the old and the young,
Those Twin Towers were standing, called Hope and called Pride,
And you can't smash the towers we hold deep inside.


So we circle the sites where our heroes did fall,
With a hand in each hand of the tall and the small,
And we mourn for our losses while knowing we'll cope,
For we still have inside that U-Pride and U-Hope.


For America means a bit more than tall towers,
It means more than wealth or political powers,
It's more than our enemies ever could guess,
So may God bless America! Bless us! God bless!


I forwarded this to an old friend that I lost touch with for many years and just rediscovered and was suprised about the ways in which our lives and thoughts had diverged so much. She said she was depressed by it. She felt it a cruel thing to do to an elegant Dr. Suess tale. She expressed much frustration with the current events and the things tragedies pring out in people who are suddenly awakened to their perpetual lack of safety in the universe and especially those who deal with it through a desire for profound violence.

It was a fascinating perspective and made me really think. I guess the thing that made me like the poem was that it was an attempt to draw a parallel in terms we would all understand that violence was not the answer, so much as a coming together to sing and overcome the pain. And for me, it was a tribute to the genius of Dr. Suess that we find parallels to such things even in times like these in his works. I've included my reaction because it explains much about me, I think.

"*blink* Wow. I'm sort of surprised by your reaction to it. I guess that compared to a lot of things that I've read on the subject this one at least seemed genuine from someone and understanding that this was not a war against Islam or the like. I personally find it a tribute to Dr. Suess' power and the amount that he has touched all of our lives that it is often him we return to at times of moral and ethical crisis, despite the child-like-ness of his verse. Yes, it's not as good as the first, but I suspect it's author knew it could never be and wanted other people to see the connections in it that he saw as apropos of our time."

"<warning: Soapbox>
I totally agree that the "bomb them back to the stone age" thing is infantile and not likely to help anything. On the other hand it is inbred survival of the fittest behavior to seek "retribution" in some fashion, so I also don't expect much more from my fellow man. I find that only the exceptional can alter those instincts particularly well by themselves and the exceptional are rarely our leaders because they understand the awesome responsibility of it. Zealous idiots make up most of us, but I guess, these days that I mostly pity them and wish they could be better convinced not to breed. On the other hand, the tone of the moment during any age often serves to illustrated the idiocy of being at least some particular kind of zealot which moves all of us at least a little closer to sanity."

"An example during this particular time is that yes, we have more patriotic zealots than we have in a while, but some of the religious and anti rights zealots like Fallwell who came out and made sweeping statements about this being the fault of the ungodly (gays, lesbians, the ACLU...) were, as far as I can tell, beaten into submission by their own constituents, probably with death threats until they shut up, and they certain have probably lost a fair bit of enduring respect for using this time to capitalize on their agenda from anyone who was walking the line."

"I guess that a number of things have left me feeling really quite lucky about the whole thing. Among them, the realization that this is the exception in our lives, not the rule. I have realized with everyone touting "God bless America" that god or whomever, possibly just ourselves have blessed this country we live in many fold. It has brought to my attention that even a mediocre president at best can be inspired to leadership. It has brought out the clarity of the respect we don't understand but that is inherent in our ability to bicker over so many smaller things and yet come together to the tune of billions of dollars, hundreds of warehouses full of supplies and the rapt attention of a nation when it matters to save a small handful of people. I believe that it does a little to make people realize that their safety has always been an illusion. That they should live their lives for every day, to remember to tell their wives and their children that they love them before they go. To teach them to use the tools of technology for their own survival. I believe that for every regression there is also a moment of learning, somewhere and that somehow we move forward with time. Maybe I'm just a cockeyed optimist with a weird pessimistic bent. But I guess that for me, hating the ignorant and prejudiced, wherever they are, serves to further the cause of hatred and puts me in the shoes of those who hate for reasons of religion, patriotism or the like, where ever they are.
</soapbox>"


" haven't asked... Are all of you and your safe & well? No casualties I hope?" -Said M.

...

"Some friends of friends. No one I knew particularly well. But it hasn't effected me the way it has most. I've always believed that there were a hundred million ways to die any day of the world accidentally. And some part of me believes that people are here for as long as they need to be. I feel that we pick our fates in some fashion to make us stronger or maybe just to bide time in our eternity, but whatever the case, it is our pain that makes us grow more than any other thing we experience."

...
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